Guidelines for Cloud Consumers and Providers

Business users are drawn to the cloud. That’s not surprising, considering they tend to see mostly benefits: self-service freedom, scalability, availability, flexibility, and the pleasure of avoiding various nasty hardware and software headaches.IT leaders though are a different story—they are not always as ecstatic.  They indicate uneasiness about cloud securityand have legitimate concerns that unauthorized users could get their hands on their applications and data. Moreover, retaining a level of influence and control is a must for them. Can both “sides” meet halfway? Is it attainable to provide the freedom that users want while having the control that IT leaders need?
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Simply put, Yes…. However, doing so will entail a collaborative effort. Both business users and IT leaders have to assume a few key responsibilities. In addition, you will have to make certain that your cloud provider will be doing its part as well.

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Your 5 Responsibilities

Here are a few things you need to be held accountable for:
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1. Define the business need. Identify the root problem you want to solve a cloud technology. Is it a perpetually recurring concern, or one that happens irregularly? Did you need an answer “last week,” or do you have time to construct a solution?

Important note: Not all clouds are created equally. Some can run your applications unchanged, with instant access; while others require little tweaking. Recognizing your needs and differentiating cloud technologies will help you determine the correct strategy for handling the particular business problem that needs attention.

2. Identify your application and process requirements. Once you have accurately defined your business needs, it is time to select the application best-suited to meet those needs. Be clear and precise about the nature of the application, the development process you want to adapt, and the roles and access permissions for each user.

Your teams no longer have to struggle through traditional linear and slow development processes. Instead, the cloud can give them access to the best practices that are fluid and agile. Many self-service solutions can even empower them to run copies of the same environment in parallel.

Simply put, the cloud may lead to breakthrough productivity when used properly. However, if used incorrectly it can also lead to enormous amounts of wasted resources. Having said this, take your time to do your research and choose wisely.

3. Determine your timetable. Cloud projects are not short sprints contrary to popular belief. They are better illustrated as long journeys over time. Please plan accordingly.

Nubifer recommends to define your early experiments in a quarterly basis because cloud technology is transformative. Learn from the first quarter, take note, and execute the necessary adjustments and then move on to the next. The objective is to generate a learning organization that increases control over time and progresses based on data and experience.

4. Establish success factors. Define what success is for you. Do you want to improve the agility of the development process? Maybe you want to increase the availability of your applications? Or perhaps you want to enhance remote collaboration? Define achievement, and have a tool to measure progress as well. Identifying metrics and establishing realistic goals will aid you achieve the solution that meets not only your needs, but also your budget and payback time frame.

5. Define data and application security. Companies overlook this critical responsibility more often than they realize. Make sure to do your due diligence and attentively determine whom you can trust with cloud application. After which, empower them. The following are questions that need unambiguous answers: What specific roles will team members take in the cloud model? Does everyone comprehend fully the nature of the application and data they are planning to bring to the cloud? Does everyone know how to protect your data? Do they understand your password policies? Dealing with these security factors early on enables you to create a solid foundation for cloud success while having your own peace of mind about this issue.

Your Provider’s 5 Responsibilities

Meanwhile, make sure your cloud provider offers the following to attain better cloud control:
1. Self-service solutions. Time equals money. Thus waiting equals wasted time and money. So search for cloud applications that are ready from the get go. Determine if the solution you are considering may implement the applications and business process you have in mind immediately, or if the provider requires you to rewrite the application or change the process entirely.

There is also a need to distinguish if users will require training, or if they already equipped to handle a self-service Web interface. Answers to these questions can determine whether adoption will be rapid and smooth, or slow and bumpy.

2. Scale and speed. A well-constructed cloud solution provides the unique combination of scale and speed. It gives you access to the resources at a scale that you need with on-demand responsiveness. This combination will empower your team to run several instances in parallel, snapshot, suspend/resume, publish, collaborate, and accelerate the business cycle.

3. Reliability and availability. As articulated in the Service Level Agreements (SLAs), it is the responsibility of the cloud provider to make the system reliable and available. The provider should set clear and precise operational expectations, such as 99.9 percent availability, with you, the consumer.

4. Security. Ask for a comprehensive review of your cloud provider’s security technology and processes. In specific, ask about the following:

  • Application and data transportability. Can your provider give you the ability to export existing applications, data and processes into the cloud with ease? And can you import back just as hassle free?
  • Data center physical security.
  • Access and operations security. How does the consumer protect its physical data centers? Are these the SAS 70 Type II data centers? Are there trained and skilled data center operators in those places?
  • Virtual data center security. Your provider must be clear about how to control the method of access to physical machines. How are these machines managed? And who are able to access these machines?
  • In terms of scale and speed, most cloud efficiency derives from how the cloud is architected. Be sure to understand how the individual pieces, the compute nodes, network nodes, storage nodes, etc., are architected and how they are secured and integrated.

Application and data security.

In order to be able to implement your policies, the cloud solution must permit you to define groups, roles with granular role-based access control, proper password policies and data encryption–both iin transit and at rest.

5. Cost efficiencies. Without any commitments upfront, cloud solutions should enable your success to drive success. Unlike a managed service or a hosting solution, a cloud solution uses technology to automate the back-end systems, and therefore can operate large resource pools without the immense human costs. Having this luxury translates all these into real cost savings for you.

Despite business leaders recognizing the benefits of cloud computing technologies, more than a handful still have questions about cloud security and control. Indeed, that is understandable. However, by adopting a collaborative approach and aligning their responsibilities with those of the cloud provider, these leaders can find solutions that offer the best of both worlds. They get the visibility and control they want and need, while giving their teams access to the huge performance gains only the cloud can provide.

Contact Nubifer for a free, no-obligation Cloud Migration consultation.

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